Harmful Algal Blooms – Part 5: Trouble in Data Land

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This Map Rocks

If you’ve read Harmful Algal Blooms, Part 4, you know that I had developed a plan to obtain the spectral signature of the Alexandrium monilatum, a toxic dinoflagellate that causes harmful algal blooms in the Chesapeake Bay watershed, from the hyperspectral data that was collected August 17, 2013. I wanted to use spectral signatures to map the extent of harmful algal blooms in the James and York Rivers. However, lots of data doesn’t always mean good data.

The hyperspectral data was collected using a sensor that was mounted on a NASA airplane. The angular cone of visibility detected by a sensor at a given time is called the Instantaneous Field of View (IFOV). The size of the IFOV determines the resolution or minimum size of a pixel.

In this image from Natural Resources Canada, area A is the IFOV and area B is the area on Earth’s surface that that can be seen at a given…

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